5th American Chess Congress; Jan 6-26, 1880
New York, NY

                              1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 
 1. Grundy, James            xx 1  10 1 11 1 01 11 11  13- 4
 2. Mackenzie, George Henry  0 xx 10  1 11 11 11 1 11  13- 4
 3. Mohle, Charles            01 xx 0 1 10 11 11 11 11  13 - 5
 3. Sellman, Alexander       01  1 xx 10 1 11 0 11 11  12- 5
 4. Judd, Max                0 0 0 01 xx 1 11 11 01 11  11 - 7
 5. Delmar, Eugene           00 00 01 0 0 xx 11 11 1 11   9- 8
 6. Ryan                     0 00 00 00 00 00 xx 11 01 11   5-12
 8. Ware, Preston            10 00 00 1 00 00 00 xx 1 1   5-12
 9. Congdon                  00 0 00 00 10 0 01 0 xx 00   3-14
10. Cohnfeld, Albert         00 00 00 00 00 00 00 0 11 xx   2-15

FIRST PLACE PLAYOFF

                  1 2
George Mackenzie  1 1  2
Grundy            0 0  0

  • This tournament featured one of the most infamous scandals in American Chess History. In the final round, Grundy was losing badly to Preston Ware at adjournment. In the resumption, Ware played listlessly and lost. Afterwards, he claimed to have made a deal with Grundy to allow a draw, in order to let Grundy keep a share of the second place money, and that Grundy had taken advantage of this and turned his listless play into a winning attempt. In Ware's words:

    "He remarked to me that he was poor, and really needed the second prize [$300]; I had, in beating him [earlier], knocked him out of the first prize [$500] ... and it would not make any difference to me if I played easily in our next game, so as to give him the second prize; ... he would be willing to give a consideration for it. I said: 'I suppose you mean for us to play for a draw.' He said: 'Yes' and I agreed to do it, and $20 was agreed upon as the consideration.

    "We agreed to play on very slowly until the other games were terminated, and to move back and forth ... and after I had done so, perhaps three or four times, I observed he was making desperate efforts to win, and finally did so, perpetrating an infamous fraud upon me."

    Grundy, naturally denied everything and the tournament committee ruled the charges unproven, as there was no witness to the deal. As a result of this game, Grundy tied for First Place with Mackenzie, though he lost the playoff.

    Was the fix in? Decide for Yourself...


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